Who is My Neighbor?

Good Samaritan – Luke 10:25-37 (Tyndale NT, 1526)

Luke-10v25-37-Good-Sam-from-1836-George-Offor-DVB-3-14-2018

One of my favorite Bible passages. Jesus’ conversation with a “certain lawyer” has important lessons for us all.

ORIGINAL SPELLING

25 And marke / A Certayne Lawere stode vp / and tempted hym sayinge: Master what shall I do / to inheret eternall lyfe? 26 He sayd vnto him: What ys written in the lawe? Howe redest thou? 27 And he answered and sayde: Thou shalt love thy lorde god / wyth all thy hert / and wyth all thy soule / and with all thy strengthe / and with all thy mynde: and thy neghbour as thy sylfe. 28 And he sayde vnto hym: Thou hast answered right. This do and thou shalt live. 29 He willynge to iustifie hym silfe / sayde vnto Iesus: Who ys then my neghbour?

30 Iesus answered and sayde: A certayne man descended from Jerusalem into Jericho / And fell into the hondes off theves / whych robbed hym off his rayment and wonded hym and departed levynge hym halfe deed. 31 And yt chaunsed that there cam a certayne preste that same waye / and sawe hym / and passed by. 32 And lyke wyse a levite / when he was come neye to the place / went and loked on him and passed by. 33 Then a certayne Samaritane / as he iornyed / cam neye vnto hym and beheld hym / and had compassion on hym 34 and cam to hym / and bounde vppe hys wondes / and poured in wyne and oyle / and layed him on his beaste / and brought hym unto a commen hostry / and drest him. 35 And on the morowe when he departed / he toke out two pence / and gave them to the host and said vnto him. Take care of him / and whatsoever thou spendest above this / when I come agayne I will recompence the. 36 Which nowe off these thre / thynkest thou was neghbour vnto him that fell into the theves hondes? 37 And he answered: he that shewed mercy on hym. Then sayde Iesus vnto hym. Goo and do thou lyke wyse.

MODERN SPELLING

25 And mark / A certain lawyer stood up / and tempted him saying: Master what shall I do / to inherit eternal life? 26 He said unto him: What is written in the law? How readest thou? 27 And he answered and said: Thou shalt love thy lord God / with all thy heart / and with all thy soul / and with all thy strength / and with all thy mind: and thy neighbor as thyself. 28 And he said unto him: Thou hast answered right. This do and thou shalt live. 29 He willing to justify himself / said unto Jesus: Who is then my neighbor?

30 Jesus answered and said: A certain man descended from Jerusalem into Jericho / And fell into the hands of thieves / which robbed him of his raiment and wounded him and departed leaving him half dead. 31 And it chanced that there came a certain priest that same way / and saw him / and passed by. 32 And likewise a Levite / when he was come nigh to the place / went and looked on him and passed by. 33 Then a certain Samaritan / as he journeyed / came nigh unto him and beheld him / and had compassion on him 34 and came to him / and bound up his wounds / and poured in wine and oil/ and laid him on his beast / and brought him unto a common hostry / and drest him. 35 And on the morrow when he departed / he took out two pence / and gave them to the host and said unto him. Take care of him / and whatsoever thou spendest above this / when I come again I will recompense thee. 36 Which now of these three / thinkest thou was neighbor unto him that fell into the thieves hands? 37 And he answered: he that showed mercy on him. Then said Jesus unto him. Go and do thou likewise.

I hope I am not the only one who enjoys reading these passages in both the original and modern spelling. I am constantly amazed that an English Bible from nearly 500 years ago is still very readable. Sometime soon I hope to show you a side by side comparison of the Wycliffe Bible of the 1380’s (written in Middle English) with the Tyndale Bible (written in Early Modern English). Reading in the original spelling is also a reminder to me of the translator, William Tyndale, who died a cruel death to bring us the Word of God in English.

Thanks for reading. Kind Regards to all who stopped by this small corner of the internet! If you wish, leave a comment or question.

Store

No pressure from me — for anyone — to buy anything.

I am truly encouraged by all who visit here. I hope you learned something about William Tyndale and his work and of course, learned more about God’s Word, too.

However, if you are curious about owning a William Tyndale New Testament? Check out our small Store. Orders are fulfilled by Christianbook Distributors located in Peabody, Massachusetts, USA.

The British Library paid over one million pounds in 1994 for an original copy of the 1526 New Testament. A facsimile (digital photocopy) of this same New Testament is available in our store — for a very reasonable price.

We have items in the store related to William Tyndale and items related to the King James Bible. Some are very inexpensive.

One example, you can rent via streaming the “Man with a Mission” documentary which features Tyndale scholar, David Daniell. It is very low cost, but quite an interesting video.

For full disclosure, I do earn a small advertising fee, if you purchase something.

English Speakers in Tyndale’s Time (6 million)

When William Tyndale translated and published the New Testament into English in 1526, there were approximately six (6) million native English speakers. It is now estimated there are about 380 million native English speakers and more than 740 million non-native English speakers. This brings the total number of English speakers to over 1 billion.

By Ethnologue rankings, English is ranked at #1 with a total of 1.12 billion speakers. Mandarin Chinese is ranked at #2 with a total of 1.10 billion speakers. (Source: Wikipedia).

The King James Bible is one of the most widely sold books in the world. Therefore, the magnificent Bible translation work which William Tyndale accomplished in the 1500’s is still being read today — since the King James Bible contains about 80% pure Tyndale in the books he was able to translate — before he was executed and burnt at the stake in 1536.

He translated these Bible books: (a) Genesis through 2 Chronicles, and the Book of Jonah in the Old Testament and (b) the entire New Testament.

William Tyndale could never have imagined that his Bible translations would reach so many people. These quotes from Tyndale are found on our About page, but they seem very fitting here, as well:

“If God spare my life, ere many years I will cause a boy who drives the plough to know more of the scriptures than you do.”

“I perceived how that it was impossible to establish the lay people in any truth except the Scripture were plainly laid before their eyes in their mother tongue.”

“I call God to record against the day we shall appear before our Lord Jesus, that I never altered one syllable of God’s Word against my conscience, nor would do this day, if all that is in earth, whether it be honor, pleasure, or riches, might be given me.”

“Christ is with us until the world’s end. Let his little flock be bold therefore.”

Thanks for reading. Kind Regards to all who stopped by this small corner of the internet! If you wish, leave a comment or question.

Store

No pressure from me — for anyone — to buy anything.

I am truly encouraged by all who visit here. I hope you learned something about William Tyndale and his work and of course, learned more about God’s Word, too.

However, if you are curious about owning a William Tyndale New Testament? Check out our small Store. Orders are fulfilled by Christianbook Distributors located in Peabody, Massachusetts, USA.

The British Library paid over one million pounds in 1994 for an original copy of the 1526 New Testament. A facsimile (digital photocopy) of this same New Testament is available in our store — for a very reasonable price.

We have items in the store related to William Tyndale and items related to the King James Bible. Some are very inexpensive.

One example, you can rent via streaming the “Man with a Mission” documentary which features Tyndale scholar, David Daniell. It is very low cost, but quite an interesting video.

For full disclosure, I do earn a small advertising fee, if you purchase something.

BEFORE the King James Bible

I had read the King James Bible for many, many years before I realized the primary translator was William Tyndale. Tyndale’s translation work began more than 85 years BEFORE the 1611 King James Bible. His English translation of the New Testament was published in 1526. He published a revised edition in 1534.

It is not a well known fact that Tyndale contributed so much to the 1611 King James Bible. However, nearly 80% of the New Testament comes directly from Tyndale’s translation work. In the Old Testament, Tyndale’s influence is there, too, but his life was taken in 1536 before he could finish.

In his lifetime, Tyndale published the Five Books of Moses (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy) and the Prophet Jonah. After Tyndale’s death in 1536, more of this Bible translation work was published (Joshua through 2 Chronicles) in the 1537 Matthew Bible.

I remember very clearly in April 2007 when I first learned of Tyndale’s work and his great sacrifices. It made a big impact on me.

Thanks for reading. Kind Regards to all who stopped by this small corner of the internet! If you wish, leave a comment or question.

Store

No pressure from me — for anyone — to buy anything.

I am truly encouraged by all who visit here. I hope you learned something about William Tyndale and his work and of course, learned more about God’s Word, too.

However, if you are curious about owning a William Tyndale New Testament? Check out our small Store. Orders are fulfilled by Christianbook Distributors located in Peabody, Massachusetts, USA.

The British Library paid over one million pounds in 1994 for an original copy of the 1526 New Testament. A facsimile (digital photocopy) of this same New Testament is available in our store — for a very reasonable price.

We have items in the store related to William Tyndale and items related to the King James Bible. Some are very inexpensive.

One example, you can rent via streaming the “Man with a Mission” documentary which features Tyndale scholar, David Daniell. It is very low cost, but quite an interesting video.

For full disclosure, I do earn a small advertising fee, if you purchase something.